Pictures

83PRO SCORE
GIVE IT AN OVERALL RATING
4.13612565445026 25 5 0
4.13612565445026
191 VOTES

It is a slider style cell phone offered by Nokia that is designed to also be used as a high-performance mobile computer.

Where to buy

Seller Price Seller Rating
Show more
Pros

5MP camera with dual LED flash, Carl Zeiss lens, lens protector

14 agree

slide out QWERTY keyboard

12 agree

open source Linux-based operating system (called Maemo)

11 agree

WiFi

11 agree

3.5mm headphone jack

10 agree

large 32GB of internal storage

10 agree

allows for multiple open applications

9 agree

GPS

9 agree

highly customizable widget based UI

8 agree

large 3.5-inch touchscreen display (800 x 480px resolution)

7 agree

expandable storage with microSD flash cards

7 agree

Firefox 3 based browser with full Flash support

7 agree

polished GUI

6 agree

auto-updating application

6 agree

powerful 600 MHz ARM Cortex - A8 superscalar microprocessor with 1 GB of system RAM

6 agree

charges off a standard micro USB port (no more proprietary Nokia adapter necessary)

3 agree

physical volume rocker

3 agree

IR port, can be used as a universal remote control

3 agree

Fm Transmitter, let's you hear music/calls through any radio (not really efficient in big cities)

3 agree

respectable full-day battery life

3 agree

ambient light sensor with great software implementation for screen brightness adjustment

2 agree

Charges through any usb port

2 agree

Ovi Store integration (since January 2010)

2 agree

TV out, great to see movies/pictures on a TV (no HD resolution)

2 agree

Qt-based application development

1 agrees

Nokia gives you root access, no hacking needed. Just install a package and click "I know what I'm doing".

1 agrees
  • Only 3 words are allowed.
Cons

currently there is no portrait mode support in Maemo 5 except for phone call functions (will be in Maemo 6, but uncertain if the N900 will see that update in late 2010)

8 agree

relatively unknown operating system means there won't be that many applications / might not take off

5 agree

unconfirmed battery life

4 agree

beta app store isn't as good as competitors offerings

4 agree

No Multitouch screen

4 agree

somewhat bulky / thick

3 agree

might not be as polished as the iPhone / Android

3 agree

Very Poor battery life

1 agrees

Unknown if Sprint will support this devices CDMA .

1 agrees
  • Only 3 words are allowed.
Edit

 

The Nokia N900 is a slider style cell phone offered by Nokia that is designed to also be used as a high-performance mobile computer. It has a full QWERTY keyboard, a 3.5" WVGA touchscreen and is powered by a 600 MHz ARM Cortex - A8 superscalar microprocessor with 1 GB of application memory making this a powerful and versatile portable device. It uses a Linux based operating system and has a 3D graphics accelerator with OpenGL ES 2.0 support. It has plenty of wireless connectivity options including 3.5G, WLAN and Quadband GSM with GPRS and EDGE giving transfer rates up to 10/2 Mbps over a cellular network and 54 Mbps over Wi-Fi. The built in 5-megapixel camera has a Carl Zeiss optical lens and dual LED flash, and is capable of recording 800 x 480 resolution video. It has a 3.5mm AV jack and uses a Maemo media player capable of playing most music file formats. It has 32 GB of internal storage letting you store up to 7000 MP3s or 40 hours of high quality video with an additional 16 GB of storage using the microSD slot. There is also a built in assisted-GPS receiver which works seamlessly with Ovi Maps.

Specifications
  • Display:
    • 3.5 inch touch-sensitive widescreen display
    • 800 × 480 pixel resolution
  • Language support: British English, American English, Canadian French, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, Latin American Spanish, Swedish, Russian
  • Connectivity:
    • 3.5mm AV connector
    • TV out (PAL/NTSC) with Nokia Video Connectivity Cable
    • Micro-USB connector, High-Speed USB 2.0
    • Bluetooth v2.1 including support for stereo headsets
    • Integrated FM transmitter
    • Integrated GPS with A-GPS
  • Battery: BL-5J 1320mAh
  • Processor and 3D accelerator: TI OMAP 3430: ARM Cortex-A8 600 MHz, PowerVR SGX with OpenGL ES 2.0 support
  • Memory: Up to 1GB of application memory (256 MB RAM, 768 MB virtual memory)
  • Size and weight
    • Volume: Approx 113cc
    • Dimensions: 110.9 × 59.8 × 18 (19.55 at thickest part) mm
    • Weight: Approx 181g
  • Mass memory:
    • 32 GB internal storage
    • Up to 16 GB of additional storage with an external microSD card
  • Keys and input method:
    • Full QWERTY tactile keyboard
    • Full QWERTY onscreen keyboard
  • Colour: Black
  • Operating frequency:
    • Quad-band GSM EDGE 850/900/1800/1900
    • WCDMA 900/1700/2100 MHz
  • Data network: GPRS class A, multislot class 32, maximum speed 107/64.2 kbps (DL/UL) EDGE class A, multislot class 32, maximum speed 296/177.6 kbps (DL/UL) WCDMA 900/1700/2100. Maximum speed PS 384/384 kbps (DL/UL) HSPA 900/1700/2100. Maximum speed PS 10/2 Mbps (DL/UL) WLAN IEEE 802.11b/g
  • Call features:
    • Integrated hands-free stereo speakers
    • Call waiting, call hold, call divert
    • Call timer
    • Logging of dialed, received and missed calls
    • Speed dialing via contact widget
    • Virbrating alert (internal)
    • Side volume keys
    • Mute/unmute
    • Contacts with images
    • Conference calling with up to 3 participants
    • Internet calling
  • Email & Messaging:
    • Supported protocols: Mail for Exchange, IMAP, POP3, SMTP
    • Support for email attachments
    • Support for rich HTML
    • SMS and Instant Messages as conversations
    • Support for Nokia Messaging service
    • Instant messaging and presence enhanced contacts
    • Multiple number, email and Instant Messaging details per contact, contacts with images
    • Support for assigning images to contacts
  • Web browsing:
    • Maemo browser powered by Mozilla technology
    • Adobe Flash 9.4 support
    • Full screen browsing
  • GPS:
    • Integrated GPS, Assisted-GPS, and Cell-based receivers
    • Pre-loaded Ovi Maps application
    • Automatic geotagging
  • Camera:
    • 5 megapixel camera (2584 × 1938 pixels)
    • Image formats: JPEG
    • CMOS sensor, Carl Zeiss optics, Tessar lens
    • 3 × digital zoom
    • Autofocus with assist light and two-stage capture key
    • Dual LED flash
    • Full-screen viewfinder
    • Photo editor on device
    • TV out (PAL/NTSC) with Nokia Video Connectivity Cable (CA-75U, included in box) or WLAN/UPnP
    • Landscape (horizontal) orientation
    • Capture modes: Automatic, portrait, video, macro, landscape, action
  • Video:
    • Wide aspect ratio 16:9 (WVGA)
    • Video recording file format: .mp4; codec: MPEG-4
    • Video recording at up to 848 × 480 pixels (WVGA) and up to 25fps
    • Video playback file formats: .mp4, .avi, .wmv, .3gp; codecs: H.264, MPEG-4, Xvid, WMV, H.263
  • Music and audio playback:
    • Maemo media player
    • Music playback file formats: .wav, .mp3, .AAC, .eAAC, .wma, .m4a
    • Built-in FM transmitter
    • Ring tones: .wav, .mp3, .AAC, .eAAC, .wma, .m4a
    • FR, EFR, WCDMA, and GSM AMR
    • DLNA
  • Personalisation:
    • Background pictures
    • Widgets on your desktops
    • Intelligent contact shortcuts
    • Shortcuts to your favourite websites
    • Shortcuts to applications
    • Themes
  • Operating system: Maemo 5 software on Linux
  • Applications:
    • Maemo Browser
    • Phone
    • Conversations
    • Contacts
    • Camera
    • Photos
    • Media player
    • Email
    • Calendar
    • Ovi Maps
    • Clock
    • Notes
    • Calculator
    • PDF reader
    • File manager
    • RSS reader
    • Sketch
    • Games
    • Widgets
    • Application manager for downloads
  • Gaming:
    • Bounce
    • Chess
    • Mahjong
  • What´s in the box:
    • Nokia N900 
    • Nokia Battery (BL-5J)
    • Nokia High Efficiency Charger (AC-10)
    • Nokia Stereo Headset (WH-205)
    • Video out cable (CA-75U)
    • Nokia charger adaptor (CA-146C)
    • Cleaning cloth
Post Review
Salimfadhley
12/09/2009 06:07

After the dissapointing N97 it was all to easy to dismiss Nokia as a fading star of mobile phone design. The flagship which failed to float was the perfect excuse for a whole horde of doomsayers to predict the end of the once-greatest mobile company. A common quip was that unless Nokia were to pull off something entirely miraculous it would be "the end". Fortunately the N900 is the miracle we had all hoped for, a truly remarkable combination of new software and hardware.

It's hard to disentangle all the novelty in this new phone: Not only is it the first of a brand new form-factor (the sliding landscape keyboard-phone), but it's also the first phone in Nokia's huge portfolio to feature Maemo, an operating system entirely new to the world of phones. That's not to say that Maemo is new: It's been on the market since 2006 but only on Nokia's ultra-niche tablet computers. Mameo itself has an even longer pedigree - it's an offshoot of Debian Linux, a highly regarded variant of the increasingly popular desktop operating system.

First of all, lets deal with the easy stuff- the hardware: Nokia vastly simplified the slider mechanism compared to the N97. Instead of the elaborate slide and tilt, this keyboard simply slides out from behind the screen. While it doesn't look so impressive it makes for a device which is both more comfortable and rugged. The new keyboard is slightly wider than the N97s since they ditched the somewhat useless D-pad. I guess they figured out that users don't actually need a d-pad and a touch-screen if the touch screen is good enough.

Ony of my big criticisms of the N97 was it's insensitive touch screen. At the time I put this down to the fact that Nokia had chosen the older "resistive" technology rather than the more trendy "capacitive" screens used by the iPhone and most android devices. The N900 has not switched to capacitative, and yet the screen seems a great deal more responsive. I've not yet encountered the frequent false-clicks of the older model. Nokia claim that the advantage of a resistive screen is that you can be more precise. This is why the N900 has a concealed stylus which slides out of the front. It's not actually possible to use a stylus on a capacitative screen, so Nokia clearly see this as giving their customers wider choices.

The other major criticism of the N97 was that it seemed sluggish compared to the high-end phones: Once again this has seems to have been fixed. Even while multitasking the N900 seems to have the processing power to stay lively and responsive. This is no doubt a consequence of the shift to Nokia's next generation operating system. Maemo is the phone's biggest new feature: It's an operating system unlike anything I've seen before on a mobile, but oddly similar to almost everything I've used on my desktop.

Unlike Symbian which was custom designed for telephony, Maemo was built for the Internet. The ability to make calls via the telephone network was a relatively recent addition to this operating system. As a consequence they've approached the idea of how telephone stuff ought to work in a radically different way: The most obvious benefit is that there's a single framework for calling which handles VOIP (e.g. Skype and Google Talk) in exactly the same consistent way as a "regular" phone call. Likewise the messaging infrastructure seamlessly integrates SMS text messages with twitter, facebook and email. It all seems connected to a degree I've never seen before.

I dont want to give the impression that it was entirely perfect:

The biggest problem with Maemo today is a complete lack of commercial apps. None of the official Google Apps (e.g. Mail, Maps) have been ported to Symbian. It also lacks some of my favourites such as Spotify, BBC iPlayer and Last.fm. There's no technical reason to doubt that these applications will eventually be ported to Maemo, however early adopters might need to beware that they might have to do without their favourite apps.

As compensation for the lack of apps, the web-browser is really good: Good enough (for example) to use the web-versions of Twitter, and BBC iPlayer. The built in multimedia conceals some pleasant surprises, such as the fact that that the it can handle high-definition DivX movie files and Ogg audio files. No other device I can think of can play all of these non-commerical formats despite the fact that they are hugely popular in the free-software world.

This lack of apps might seem scary, especially in comparison to Apple's much hyped hundred-thousand but it's not likely to be a problem in the long term: Unlike the older generation of phone which was built around proprietary code which was difficult for developers to learn the N900 is built on technology that is common today and widely used. Anybody who can develop for Linux can develop for this phone which means that there are already hundreds of thousands of developers who have the skills required to build Maemo apps. As a consequence I expect that Maemo will quickly catch up other platforms since the cost of building for this platform is relatively low.

So is the N900 the "iPhone Killer" that everybody's been pining for? No, and thankfully not. I think this product represents an entirely new territory for the mobile phone industry. Rather than replicate Apple's model of a tightly controlled environment, Nokia are emphasizing openness by borrowing a strategy which has worked so well for the open-source movement. This is the most open mobile platform on the market today, and I feel that proposition alone will draw in the "core" of developers who will in turn deliver the novel applications which will usher in a wider audience.

About Us