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69PRO SCORE
GIVE IT AN OVERALL RATING
3.46938775510204 14 5 0
3.46938775510204
49 VOTES

This router is certified by the Wi-Fi Alliance as a Draft 2.0 802.11n product, due to its dual-band stream capabilities.

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Pros

comes with an open source Linux kernel at heart

5 agree

runs popular fully-featured open-source platforms such as DD-WRT and Tomato

4 agree

configurable as a wireless repeater for extending network range

3 agree

includes 802.11N functionality - finally ratified as the next generation specification with improved range and throughput through MIMO

3 agree

USB port - for use with dumb external storage to create a fully functional NAS without the need for an online PC host

3 agree

affordable considering the open nature and fast hardware

3 agree

slick space saving enclosure

2 agree

gigabit wired connections with LED indication - green if full 1000Mbit or orange if only 10/100

2 agree

backwards compatible with older 802.11B/G devices

2 agree

multiple SSID support (create a sub-network with different access privileges etc.)

2 agree

able to run 802.11G and 802.11N networks simultaneously or support up to 300Mbit throughput

2 agree

closed source nature of Netgears default installation does not hinder advanced users in any way - complies with the spirit of the GPL

2 agree

USB port can be used further for custom built applications..

1 agrees
  • Only 3 words are allowed.
Cons

violates the GPL with closed source modules

3 agree

Gigabit Ethernet switch cannot handle jumbo frames

3 agree

based on Broadcom hardware - closed specifications

2 agree

does not run on the 5GHz band (despite the Broadcom chip's support for it)

2 agree

somewhat expensive for the majority of consumers who probably won't use the routers advanced functionality anyway

2 agree

closed source modules make upgrading the kernel impossible without breaking potential functionality - unless you plan on completely changing the routers software platform

2 agree

poor range .. worse than the G open-source router Linksys WRT54GL

1 agrees
  • Only 3 words are allowed.
Edit

 

The Netgear RangeMax 300 is an intermediate-level wireless 802.11n router, or access point designed for users with basic to moderate network connectivity needs. This router is certified by the Wi-Fi Alliance as a Draft 2.0 802.11n product, due to its dual-band stream capabilities. Advanced users have the option of loading a linux-based firmware onto this device as well. The RangeMax is capable of a maximum bandwidth of 300 Mbps. This router is backwards compatible with 802.11b and 802.11g connections, and includes 4 gigabit Ethernet ports for wired connections. In terms of security, WPA and WPA2 are fully supported with 128-bit encryption. WiFi Protected Setup mode is also available for those with limited security knowledge. Users who need to access files over a network can make use of the integrated USB port, and attach an external hard drive. The Netgear RangeMax 300 can be configured and maintained through any modern web browser.

Features
  • 802.11b/g/n capabilities
  • Dual-band stream radios
  • 300 Mbps maximum bandwidth
  • 4 wired gigabit Ethernet ports
  • WEP/WPA/WPA2 128-bit encryption
  • QoS (Quality of Service) support
  • WiFi Protected Setup mode
  • USB port for external storage
  • Linux-based firmware compatible
Post Review
Erik
08/23/2010 09:57

I had big hopes for this router when it came in today from Amazon.ca. I bought this as an upgrade to my Linksys WRT54GL running the Tomato firmware. My hope was that this newer N router would have an improved range over my older G router. This is simply not true, and I'll be making a return to Amazon for a full refund minus shipping :(.

Dom
06/14/2010 01:07

802.11n does not require to be run in the 5GHz band, but is speficied to be able to run on both. There are routers that only support .n in 2.4GHz, others that are statically switchable between 2.4GHz and 5GHz, some that only run at 5GHz, and some that run both simultaneously. This router is apparently only running .g and .n simultaneously in the 2.4GHz band, which isn't bad, but the 5GHz analog front-end was omitted by Netgear.

Also, if you have multiple PC's running Gigabit Ethernet, support of jumbo frames becomes important even if your hosts are very fast. The rate at which IRQs are issued at the typical Ethernet frame size of 1.5k bytes at Gigabit speed takes an unnecessarily high toll on the hosts' CPU time. Jumbo frames have been around for many years and aren't a new trick. I don't understand why it's still not supported by everyone.

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