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52 VOTES

The Lenovo ThinkPad X100e is a thin and lightweight notebook featuring an AMD Athlon Neo processor, up to 4GB of RAM.

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Pros

includes both a multi-touch trackpad and trackpoint - whereas the X200 leaves out the trackpad

3 agree

comes with Windows 7

3 agree

4-in-1 card reader integrated (unlike many business-oriented laptops)

3 agree

low-light sensitive webcam

3 agree

ultra-portable form factor - compact 11.6" display, ~3 pounds

3 agree

affordable starting price point

3 agree

new chiclet style keyboard lives up to the well-established build quality and usability of the original ThinkPad keyboard

3 agree

11.6" matte display with 720p capable resolution (1366 x 768px)

3 agree

quality matte display cover feels smooth, doesn't scratch or pick up every fingerprint

2 agree

also available in red

2 agree

famous ThinkPad build quality

2 agree

first ThinkPad which is AMD exclusive

2 agree

AMD single and dual core options, with Radeon graphics - much more powerful than Intel Atom / Intel GMA at this price point

2 agree

integrated mobile broadband option

1 agrees
  • Only 3 words are allowed.
Cons

gets pretty hot

2 agree

unimpressive battery life doesn't measure up to the rest of the X series / ThinkPad lineup, poor for an ultraportable

2 agree

battery sticks out the back, adds to the overall weight of the device

2 agree

hinges are not the same over-engineered metal design that has come standard on all ThinkPad laptops

2 agree

limited port selection - no HDMI / DisplayPort

2 agree

webcam is only 0.3MP

2 agree

1GB of memory standard will lead to poorer performance if not bumped up, is a money grab

1 agrees

speakers on the front bottom of the device get muffled if you use it in your lap

1 agrees

very bad display quality (despite being matte)

1 agrees

no eSATA / USB 3.0 port for high-speed external drives

1 agrees

keyboard lacks dedicated volume controls

1 agrees
  • Only 3 words are allowed.
Edit

 

The Lenovo ThinkPad X100e is a thin and lightweight notebook featuring an AMD Athlon Neo processor, up to 4GB of RAM, and either a 320GB or 500GB SATA hard-disc drive. It’s technically a notebook, but yet features an ultra-portable design reminiscent of a netbook. Its specifications are therefore somewhat at the lower end of the spectrum: a relatively small 11.6” display, standard Ethernet, and WiFi. There is speculation though that the X100e might also boast a third-party graphics card, as well as optional 3G/Bluetooth connectivity. One thing that is for certain is the inclusion of a distinct ThinkPad keyboard, trackpad, and trackpoint.

Features
  • Ultra-Portable Notebook
  • AMD Athlon Processor
  • DDR3 RAM
  • SATA HDD
  • 11.6” Display
  • Wired/Wireless
  • Third-Party Graphics
  • Optional 3G/Bluetooth
Specifications
  • OS: Genuine Windows 7
  • Processor: AMD Athlon Neo MV-40
  • Memory: Up to 4GB
  • Display: 11.6” (1366x768)
  • Storage: 320/500GB; 2.5” 5400rpm HDD
  • Connectivity: 802.11b/g/n; Optional Bluetooth; 3G
  • Input: Trackpoint / Multi-Touch Touchpad
  • Camera: .3MP
  • Battery: 3 Cell; 6 Cell
Post Review
Yale
08/14/2010 05:28

My brother ordered this laptop under my instruction for use at school next year. He wanted something basic and affordable for the simplest of tasks, but also something slick and small for taking to class. I suggested this as a more durable and more usable alternative to a netbook for when he needs to write papers or take notes, or for watching HD YouTube. My main selling points were the fact that it was a ThinkPad with a good quality construction that would last his school career (he was sold on that), that it had a good keyboard and trackpad - not to mention a Trackpoint (he couldn't care less), and that it was light (~3 pounds) while still being a good size, with good display resolution (also didn't really seem to care much about what a screen resolution even was, he's a bit of a Luddite)!

I've gotten to play around on the device for a while, installing applications and fooling around a bit and here are my personal observations:

The keyboard is unbelievable. Well done Lenovo! It goes right to the edges and is possibly more comfortable than the one I have on my T400. The travel is superior, for sure, making key hits a little more definitive like my standard mechanical board on my desktop - which helps improve my speed. Unfortunately there are no dedicated volume buttons, which is a bit of a bummer. There is also less room for most things, so compared to the one I'm used to it's a bit different. For instance the dedicated front and back surfing buttons have been replaced by page up and down.

It includes a big multitouch trackpad (possibly bigger than mine?) and a Trackpoint, which itself feels great - raised nicely and very tight. The buttons for the Trackpoint are larger and a bit harder / cheaper feeling than that on my T400. They don't depress as nicely, so I found it didn't give the same tactile response I was expecting. It reminds me of the change in quality on the Apple iPod Nano line, my aging 2G having a much nicer, smoother scroll wheel compared to the ones found on today's 4th and 5th generation devices. I hope this isn't where Lenovo is going with their quality in general, but I'm still happy it's there for the price.

The weight, size and thinness are ideal for use on the go, while still being comfortable enough for longer term use. The build quality is also up to par, when it comes to having the reinforced lid hinges, quality material feel, and solid construction, but everything is overall much thinner and less 'tank like' which can be seen as both good and bad, depending on how you look at it. This is also why I suggested it for his use, as many people (kids) don't care as much about the durability of their expensive tools (toys) as they do about the looks. It's a fair compromise that doesn't go too far in either direction.

There are downfalls with a $600 ultra-portable X-series though, mainly the performance, battery life and heat / noise. As my usage habits have evolved I find that I actually demand way more from my laptop in terms of all of these things. While my brother has the dual core model at 1.6GHz - and don't get me wrong, it should be fine for his basic needs - I find I've been completely spoiled by my 2.8GHz, SSD combo. Similarly, regardless of the fact that my Intel is a 35W processor, my T400 stays cool in my lap when doing basic tasks, and only every pipes up when I start to strain it. In comparison the AMD powered X100e is always warm and audible, and gets uncomfortably loud and hot when strained. For most this isn't worth the $600+ step up to the Intel based X201, but for me it is. Battery life is less of a concern for me, but maybe not for him once he gets to school. The X100e can last 2-4 hours, whereas my 9-cell T400 lives 4-7 depending on settings, and that's pretty significant if you're going for a full day of class without access to power. He'll have that, fortunately, whereas I rarely did.

In conclusion I'd like to say a bit about my personal tastes and choices. This form factor was originally what I was interested in when I first started considering a mobile device to best compliment my reliance on a desktop for work and pleasure. After rejecting netbooks and a year or so of waiting for a budget ultra-portable from the likes of Lenovo I spent double and bought my much larger and heavier T400, but now after seeing this unit I can safely say I still feel I made the right choice. My back and my wallet don't have any regrets! If I were to choose again today, I might spend a bit more and go for the X201 or T410s, but the price bump - more specifically on the T410s - might just still be a deal breaker.

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