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84PRO SCORE
GIVE IT AN OVERALL RATING
4.21428571428571 33 5 0
4.21428571428571
210 VOTES

Open-source operating system based on Linux, and is designed to be embedded on mobile devices adhering to the Android standard.

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Pros

Totally open API

21 agree

Android app marketplace is democratic (unlike Apple's)

16 agree

Device and network-independent software platform

15 agree

true multi-tasking OS based on Linux kernel

13 agree

cloud integration with Google services like Gmail, calendar, contacts -- keeps them in sync always & effortlessly

12 agree

Mostly free third-party apps

11 agree

OS is updated often! even for older devices like the HTC Dream (T-Mobile G1)

11 agree

It's google!

10 agree

has great potential to scale well up to higher-end devices like smartbooks (various laptop manufacturers experimenting with this)

9 agree

can browse for apps on website for PCs, select and install them over-the-air to the Android phone (from v2.2)

5 agree

Java based development

5 agree

v2.2 (FroYo) comes with JIT compiler that boosts performance up to 5x compared to previous versions, faster than any other mobile OS

5 agree

integrates full mobile-optimized Adobe Flash 10.1 (from v2.2 FroYo), and browser is still as fast as iPhone 4's

5 agree

has the fastest mobile browser! (beats iOS 4, especially on JavaScript-heavy sites)

4 agree

You can try Android on your PC using LiveAndroid LiveCD

4 agree

Integration with Picasa

3 agree

Great HTML5 support

2 agree

Can sideload lots of apps

2 agree

Live wallpapers

2 agree

Intuitive interface

2 agree

Highly customizable

2 agree

Fast

2 agree

Many excellent web browsers available

2 agree

(Android 4.1+) Google Now

1 agrees

Extensive developer options

1 agrees

Great apps

1 agrees

(Android 4.1) Expandable notification menu

1 agrees

(Android 4.1+) Safe Mode boot

1 agrees

(Android 4.0+) Data usage tracker

1 agrees

Many phone choices

1 agrees

Best mobile browser

1 agrees

Ability to add Widgets

1 agrees

Great phones

1 agrees

Tha Bomb

1 agrees

Emulators

1 agrees

Easily hackable

1 agrees

Most popular mobile OS

1 agrees
  • Only 3 words are allowed.
Cons

Java based development

8 agree

Few payment options for app marketplace - only Google Checkout

6 agree

User lacks the ability to definitively close applications from within task manager

5 agree

fewer developers and a smaller user base than the more established iPhone / iOS software ecosystem

4 agree

new Proprietary 'OS Overlays' by handset manufacturers reduce the frequency of Android OS updates they can provide

4 agree

No review process on the app marketplace, nothing stopping malware from getting published

2 agree

Limited to Google accounts

2 agree

'true' multi-tasking more applicable to desktops and not mobile devices

1 agrees

Inferior web browser to iPhone

1 agrees

no multi-touch implementations on handsets sold in the U.S. (up to at least Android v2.1)

0 agrees
  • Only 3 words are allowed.
Edit

 

Android is an open-source mobile phone platform developed by Google and the Open Handset Alliance, announced on November 5th, 2007 and released on October 22, 2008 with the T-Mobile G1 in the USA. It is an open-source operating system based on Linux, and is designed to be embedded on mobile devices adhering to the Android standard. The most significant features of Android is that it carries no licensing free to be used by phone manufacturers and is an an open platform that third-party developers can easily create applications for using standard API calls implemented by the independent hardware manufacturers. Android comes equipped with many built-in applications including dialing, messaging, media playback, and with immediate availability to mobile versions of Google search, Google Maps, and Google Products but the intention is to have other developers create new applications in the future. All applications are given equal weight, such that even the basic dialing app can be overwritten. An SDK and an NDK are freely available for download, and so developers can get started developing for the Android platform. The Android OS is used in handsets manufactured by HTC, LG Electronics, Motorola, Samsung, Acer, Huawei, and Sony Ericsson, and Android devices are available on all national carriers in the U.S. (T-Mobile,  Verizon, Sprint, AT&T). The current version of Android is 2.1 (Eclair), released on January 5, 2010, and version 2.2 (Froyo) has been announced at Google I/O in May 2010.

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VesNL
07/11/2012 03:48

Android 4.1 is pretty bad ass

Kdm
04/26/2011 07:59

How the above Con should have read...

Proprietary 'OS Overlays' by handset manufacturers reduce the frequency of Android OS updates they can provide, thus leading to:
i) Fragmentation within the Android-based phone market.
ii) Reduced user experience owing to outdated firmware.
iii) Reduced attractiveness of the platform for developers, resulting in fewer available [functional] applications.

Erik
12/02/2010 10:58

AH! I can't wait for #Android Froyo 2.2 to come to my phone. The 5X speed, voice search, and compatibility with Google Car Dock mode. There's a leaked early build for the Captivate, but I'm not willing to risk it.

Rory Kw

Rory Kw

12/02/2010 03:44

It's actually less of a risk than you might think. I'm still using leaked/UK Éclair firmware on my Samsung Galaxy Spica because it actually runs better than the Rogers version.

That said, it's not like I'm keeping up on firmware releases for the Galaxy S phones. There's a great community for firmware and rooting on Samsung phones, though, that helped me out quite a bit.

http://androidforums.com/samsung-captivate/

http://forum.samdroid.net/f49/

Erik

Erik

12/02/2010 05:08

Thanks Rory. I think I may just root my phone.

Erik
11/26/2010 03:00

The sharing of photos on #Android is awesome, especially the integration with #google_picasa

Dom

Dom

11/26/2010 11:55

sounds great :-) I'm looking forward to making the Android leap soon.... Nexus S I hope.

Erik
11/24/2010 11:51

Blarg!!! I can't wait for #Android Froyo 2.2 to come to my phone. Voice search, 5X OS speed improvement, and faster browser. Hopefully, better battery life.

ScottP

ScottP

11/24/2010 11:54

The improved battery life would be more important to me than any of the other upgrades.

Erik

Erik

11/24/2010 12:18

Ya battery life borderlines on "sucks". I'm actually considering buying a second battery for $25.

ScottP

ScottP

11/24/2010 12:21

Is there a decent secondary battery? I don't want to have an annoying attachment on my phone.

Erik

Erik

11/24/2010 12:24

Oh, I was just thinking of an actual batter that you swap out. Get an external charger, too.

Yale

Yale

11/24/2010 03:00

Can't you get 2.2 stock already? I'd probably try to unlock my phone and flash it with a HTC sense or stock. I hear the Samsung modifications really aren't that great.

Erik

Erik

11/24/2010 03:02

Not sure if I'm going to go that route. What are the benefits / risks?

Yale

Yale

11/24/2010 03:39

Well I don't know about the risk, but you'll get updates a lot faster. Samsung will probably never release a 2.3 update officially. That alone should get you on board.

Omar

Omar

11/24/2010 04:15

But the warranty! The warranty!!!!

Dom
07/07/2010 08:00

There's a performance benchmark with Froyo's new browser: Ars Technica: Android 2.2 demolishes iOS4 in JavaScript benchmarks.

Note that these benchmarks are only JavaScript, and you'll see the major advantage over iOS as shown in the benchmarks only on JavaScript-heavy sites. On "normal" sites the browsers are head-to-head in loading speed, however, Froyo integrates a full Adobe Flash 10.1, which Apple's iOS doesn't.

Erik
12/06/2007 03:32

I think that the Android platform has huge promise and could be a great move for Google and consumers alike. To get an idea of what Android promises, think back to all the criticism the Apple iPhone has faced (no third-party apps, exclusive arrangement with AT&T). The Android is the exact opposite. Want to create a Google Maps / Instant Messager mashup? Go ahead, the SDK is public. It looks awesome too. I suggest watching some of the videos on the Android official site.

Personally, I'll be holding off on buying a next-gen mobile until Android comes out.

Erik

Erik

12/09/2011 09:57

Wow, Erik. I give myself kudos. Look at the date of this post!!!

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